Publication Impact

I prepared this for a Wikipedia editor who felt that if you haven’t been on TV, you’re not important. Someone else erected my original page, which sat for 15 years or so. Now this person wanted evidence of my accomplishments. The point here is all my neuroscience papers went to the highest-rated journals. This editor wanted references for everything; thus the table below.

    \[ \begin{tabular}{|c|l|l|} \hline {\bf Journal} & {\bf IF} & {\bf  X}\\ \hline International Journal of Neuroscience & 0.8 & 0\\ Biological Cybernetics & 1.7&0\\ Visual Neuroscience & 1.7&0\\ Neural Networks & 1.9&0\\ Vision Research & 2.3&0\\ Neural Computation & 2.3&0\\ Brain Research Bulletin & 2.5&0\\ Brain Research Bulletin & 2.5&0\\ Brain Research & 2.6&0\\ Journal of Vision & 2.8&0\\ {\bf Journal of Neurophysiology} & 2.9& {\bf 2}\\ Neuroinformatics & 3.0&0\\ Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience & 5.3&0\\ Cerebral Cortex & 6.8&0\\ {\bf Journal of Neuroscience} & 7.3  & {\bf 1}\\ {\bf Current Biology} & 8.9 & {\bf 2}\\ {\bf Nature Neuroscience} & 17 & {\bf 3}\\ {\bf {Nature Reviews Neuroscience} & 30 & {\bf 1}\\ {\bf Annual Review of Neuroscience} & 34 & {\bf 1}\\ {\bf Science } & 35 & {\bf 2}\\ {\bf Nature} & 38 & {\bf 2}\\ \hline \end{tabular} \]

The mean impact factor (IF) for journals hosting Bradley papers from 1992 – 2008 was 22 (publications indicated in bold). For all other candidate journals, the mean was 2.8. The far right column, labeled “X”, denotes the number of times I published in a particular journal.